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Mayday Monday- The Radio Call

FullSizeRenderIn reviewing all the procedures and policies related to Mayday incidents, we have to remember the actual call itself from the trapped or lost firefighter. Does your department have a standard information set that needs to be transmitted out to the Incident Commander or the dispatch center. This is a crucial script that needs to be practiced by your crew members during weekly or monthly drills. This skill set must be able to be transmitted quickly and contain all the information desired by your department or company. In most cases of a Mayday call, the firefighter or officer is under extreme conditions and stressors. This may also be the only radio transmission that you will receive from them, so the practiced information should contain the basics to get the RIT moving under direction from command. How you or your department lay this information, and the procedures following the Mayday should fit your department. But basically it should start with:

1- MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY

2- WHO – Who is calling the Mayday?

3- WHAT – What is the problem?

4. WHERE – Where are you located in the structure

After this quick transmission, depending on local radio systems the pressing or activation of the emergency button on the radio could be added. With all the technology that is available to us through the new radios that are being manufactured, we must UNDERSTAND all that technology and ensure it works with our Mayday procedures. After this transmission the IC can then try obtaining further information by using the LUNAR acronym. Location, Unit, Needs, Air and Resources.

We will post a copy of some Mayday procedures at www.traditionstraining.com on the Resources Page. Please remember to DRILL, DRILL and DRILL some more on this procedure.

Posted by | Posted in Blog, Combat Ready, command-leadership, Incident Command, RIT / Survival, technology-communications, Training Resources, training-development, training-fire-rescue-topics | Posted on 13-10-2014

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FDIC 2012: 25 TO SURVIVE (Lecture)

**This week we are featuring a short run-down of each of the programs that our staff will be presenting at this year’s FDIC in Indianapolis**

Tuesday (Pre-Conf Workshop, 130p-530p) – 25 to Survive

25 to Survive

TT’s Lt. Mitchell and Capt. Shaw will co-present thier flagship program, 25 to Survive:  The Residential Building Fire.  This program highlights 25 critical areas that present themselves to operating forces at the number one fireground killer of civilians and firefighters alike.  They will present this engaging, interactive presentation will focus on pre-incident, operations and post incident operations.  They will give you street smart tips and take home drills to make yourself and your fire company better prepared at the next residential fire you respond to.  


Lieutenant Douglas J.Mitchell Jr., Fire Department of New York and Captain Daniel D. Shaw, Fairfax County Fire & Rescue:

Course Summary:  More firefighters are seriously injured and killed while operating at residential building fires than at any other fire we encounter. This dynamic and interactive lecture program will address 25 critical firefighting errors and issues common to the residential building. Learn sound tips and take home practical drills to address and correct errors at residential fires. Topics include combat-ready attitude, leadership techniques, SCBA confidence, overcoming building construction features (setbacks, long stretches), communication failures on the fireground, developing and delivering sound and accurate on-scene reports, coordinated ventilation, and more.

 

Posted by | Posted in administration-leadership, Blog, Combat Ready, command-leadership, Company News, Engine Company, fire-rescue-topics, firefighting-operations, Incident Command, line-of-duty, RIT / Survival, technology-communications, Tips & Skills, Truck Company, Upcoming Classes | Posted on 08-02-2012

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Progress Reports for the Incident Commander

The Progress Report is a valuable tool to the Incident Commander and the companies working on the fireground. The report should be given at the 20 minute time mark and subsequent time marks at intervals of 20 minutes into the incident (i.e. 40 minute and 60 minute timestamps of the incident).

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZZkC_hqpQw

The report has two good reasons to be delivered:

1. This report will provide all tactically assigned units a painted picture of the incident scene and where the incident stands at that time. This picture can be very helpful to units that may not have the chance to see the big picture, or are involved in tasks that do not let them see the whole incident. Either way the companies are afforded a picture of the scene and the status of the major tactical benchmarks.

2. The progress report is a vital tool to the Incident Commander. This report will make the IC evaluate the incident, write down the findings on the worksheet and then transmit the report over the radio. It is very easy for an Incident Commander to be distracted mitigating an incident by personnel requesting assignments or  the incident itself so a report at 20 minutes will force the IC to make sure that their situational awareness is correct for incident. A forced review at 20 minute intervals will ensure that the incident is being constantly evaluated for the correct strategy and tactics and evaluating safety on the fireground.

By making this part of your habit at the command post you will make sure that your situational awareness is always correct for the incident.

Posted by | Posted in administration-leadership, Blog, Combat Ready, command-leadership, fire-rescue-topics, firefighting-operations, fires, Incident Command, technology-communications, Tips & Skills, training-development, training-fire-rescue-topics, videos | Posted on 29-11-2010

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Video & Training Tips from House Fire with One Trapped

TT Instructor Joe Brown created this video of operations at a first floor fire last tour with a civilian rescued from the second floor.  While some of the video is dark, what should be emphasized in this situation is the communication between crews.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYeMhR4-usU

The rescue of a civilian is an exciting event.  Our primary mission is to save lives and when a victim is located it can tend to draw others away from their tasks.  You will notice in this video that when the victim is located, assistacne is given to the victim removal where needed but the other tasks continue, and when the victim is removed everyone get’s back to work. We must remember that a successful fireground results from a coordinated series of events – everyone has a job to do and must do it.  If someone drops their task, the entire fireground falls apart.

At present, all accounts are that the victim is hospitalized and will make a full recovery.  Job well done to the members of DCFD Engine 30 / Truck 17, Platoon #1!

Posted by | Posted in Blog, command-leadership, fire-rescue-topics, firefighting-operations, fires, news, rescues, technology-communications, Tips & Skills, training-development, training-fire-rescue-topics, Truck Company, videos | Posted on 11-08-2010

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"I Never Heard a Trash Man Scream…" – Staying Cool & Collected on the Radio

My trash gets picked up on Tuesdays and Fridays.  Like fires, it’s a little variable – sometimes they come early, sometimes late.  Sometimes I have a big load, sometimes little, occasionally I throw them off with recyclables.  After a birthday get-together this past week I had a particularly large pile of trash.  A big job for the fellas!  I was sure they’d be excited… However I was dismayed when the trash truck rounded the corner and none of the trashmen were yelling:  “big pile!  we gotta job!  we’re gonna need more gloves!  get the crusher ready!  HE’S GOT CARDBOARD BOXES!!!!” They’re trashmen.  They expect to pick up trash.  We’re firefighters, we should expect to go to fires.

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Posted by | Posted in administration-leadership, Blog, Combat Ready, command-leadership, Commentary, fire-rescue-topics, firefighting-operations, fires, Incident Command, news, rescues, technology-communications, Tips & Skills, training-development, training-fire-rescue-topics, videos | Posted on 12-07-2010

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Rings, Tags, Clips & Velcro…

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Accountability hardware systems:  TAGS, RINGS, CLIPS, VESTS, BOARDS, VELCRO, PAPER LISTS, MAGNETS, COMPUTER CHIPS… they come in all shapes and sizes, limited usually only by your budget.  Your department can use a pre-made “canned one”…off the fire-salesman’s shelf, copy and adapt one that works for department nearby or dream up your own….but in reality….

The “HARDWARE” part of an accountability system is rather immaterial. (more…)

Posted by | Posted in administration-leadership, Blog, Combat Ready, command-leadership, firefighter-safety-health, firefighting-operations, Incident Command, RIT / Survival, technology-communications | Posted on 14-02-2010