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Standpipes or not, you need a "rack"!

They have a lot of names:  standpipe pack, apartment pack, high-rise load, etc… I guess you have to call them something but these names can be decieving.  They imply that this load of hose only has one use.  However in truth, a bundle of hose with a nozzle and some accessories is HIGHLY useful in a variety of engine company situations.

Your engine NEEDS this, or something like it...

Your engine NEEDS this, or something like it...

For this reason, I like to simply call this ready-to-go soluation a “RACK”.  And, whether you have tons or standpipes/high-rises/apartments, or none – YOU NEED ONE.  Read on to see why…

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Posted by | Posted in Blog, Engine Company, fire-rescue-topics, firefighter-safety-health, firefighting-operations, Tips & Skills, training-development, training-fire-rescue-topics | Posted on 19-05-2010

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Engine Company Versatility & Teamwork

ShowLetter

7806 LRT-1
Could your engine’s setup handle BOTH these fires?

There are many scenarios that an engine company may face in any given district.  From car fires to smaller SFD’s closer to the curb, long stretches from the engine or into deep buildings, heavy duty operations, standpipes etc…  It’s a lot to ask to have our apparatus setup to handle all these different scenarios.  All to often you see an engine company setup with no versatility in it’s handline selection – leaving it equipped to handle one type of fire very well, and all other types not so well.

Nevertheless, few departments have a rig with enough room to have a dedicated handline for each sceanario.  For the rest us, we need to learn to setup our engine company apparatus to have a versatlie assortment of handlines and train on using that complement of lines in various ways…

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Posted by | Posted in Blog, Combat Ready, Commentary, Engine Company, fire-rescue-topics, firefighting-operations, Tips & Skills, training-development, training-fire-rescue-topics | Posted on 28-01-2010

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Wyes and Wall Cabinets

Would your gated wye fit in this cabinet?

Many companies use a wye on their standpipe rack, but this will be too large for most “wall cabinet” style connections. Such was the case at this fire in an apartment building.

In such case, use of a standard reducer, used here, will be required. Another option is to carry a small “pony” section of 2.5″ that can be connected directly to the connection, allowing the larger wye to sit outside the cabinet.

The presence of this style standpipe connection in your district is yet another thing that the “Combat Ready” firefighter should know through proper district familiarization.

The hallway of the fire building would be a terrible time to discover that your wye doesn’t fit and you are without a reducer! Any delay in getting water on the fire in a occupied apartment building could have tragic consequences. Many engine company firefighters in areas with lots of standpipes carry a reducer in their pocket just in case…

Stay safe & Happy Holidays from the staff here at Traditions Training!

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Posted by | Posted in Blog, Combat Ready, Engine Company | Posted on 20-12-2009

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"FUNCTION over FORM"

Most of us have had the unfortunate experience of working/volunteering for a boss who is much more concerned about how something looks rather than how it works…  Unfortunately you can see this illustrated on A LOT of fire apparatus out there.   

  • Dysfunctional hose loads – because we don’t want hose-ears or nozzles sticking out…
  • Inaccessible tools…
Fortunately, not all fire chiefs think like this.  Some are able to recognize that fire trucks are for firefighting, not for winning the county parade.  Joshua Schreiber from the Parkesburg (PA) Fire Department is fortunate enough to have such a chief (Chief Ray Stackhouse).  He sent in this idea regarding the recent standpipe rack discussions….

 

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Posted by | Posted in Blog, Engine Company | Posted on 15-09-2008

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Engine Company Ops: Standpipe Racks…

Really, I hate the term “high-rise” rack or “apartment bag” – or whatever you call it.  Those names imply single-situation use.  What these things are really is “100′ of easily carried/deployable hose with a spare nozzle”.  They are great for extending pre-connected lines long distances, or making up a gap when we come up short.  For this reason, every engine company should have some type of “standpipe rack” even if you don’t have a standpipe, or a building over 1 story, anywhere in your first due.

We could talk alot about high-rise fires and standpipes, but I just want to talk for a minute about setting up our equipment.  The goal of an engine company should be to get their hoseline in service as a team.  This means dividing the equipment up equally amongst the team.  If you have 3 or 4 firefighters on the rig, the load should be distributed evenly – this way we all get to the fire floor with a little energy left to work with.  Here are my thoughts….

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Posted by | Posted in Blog, Engine Company | Posted on 08-09-2008